Tag Archives: ASA

The ASA and CAP Code implications on online marketing (SMWF pt 2)

Malcolm Phillips from the The ASA presented on how the changes in the CAP Code will affect social media marketing.

The ASA rules in disputes about whether a marketing campaign or activity is legal, decent, truthful and honest. Recently this remit extended online.

From a cynical perspective, does The ASA limit creativity in protecting consumers? Does this actually just create an open season where competing companies simply complain about each others claims to try and gain a moral advantage in the marketplace?

It seems that Facebook and Twitter are going to be prioritised simply because of their meteoric rise in a few years and due to the sheer numbers of users and increasing number of brands using them for promotional purposes.

But The ASA is clear that it is not interested in policing spontaneous customer interaction, engagement and customer service. Rather, it is in two areas: claims being made, and the use of user-generated content by marketers.

The ASA deal with many false claim cases, ranging from the unavailability of goods despite being advertised as such to specific product benefits that may be implied but can not be proven.

Brands have to be mindful of using user-generated content. Ministry of Sound fell foul of this when younger clubbers posted photos of themselves attending clubnights holding alcoholic drinks which gave the illusion of under-age drinking. Rules affect food claims, pharmaceuticals and other areas too.

Sponsorships and endorsements on social media also need to be clearly labelled, with a case involving Rolls Royce cited as a warning. Rolls Royce used a number of celebrities including the model Daisy Lowe as Twitter ambassadors for the brand.

Summary

The ASA argued it wasn’t citing creativity and reminded the audience that the advertising industry had asked for greater clarity to ensure a level playing field.

What do you think?

Read pt 1 here.

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My Twitter week (w/e 6 March 2011)

A belated post (everthing seems to be belated at the moment with two boys and a marathon to consider!)

Monday was Oscar’s fall out day, where The Social Network missed out on the biggies. It was fascinating watching the breakfast shows falling over themselves to get a minute with the celebrities attending the post Oscar’s parties. Quite why people like Jamie Oliver and Katie Price were there remains beyond me.

In the Twittersphere, Econsultancy were remarking on another brand penalised for dodgy SEO practice, this time JC Penney. Be warned, like TV licence vans, they get you eventually. New rules on product placement on British TV were unveiled, paving the way for fries with everything.

Tuesday came with news that The ASA is now including online campaigns, websites and email marketing within its policing claims remit.

Wednesday, I headed to Technology for Marketing and Advertising at Earls Court. If you missed my write-ups, head over the BDB Blog or click here and then here. There was still time (and wifi) to pick up the ‘official’ launch of Seth Godin’s new output from his publishing Domino Project, a new book called Poke the Box.

Thursday saw Charlie Sheen‘s Guinness Book of Records entry following his tigerblood enfused Twitter antics hit the mass media.

On Friday, a genius Royal Wedding cash-in was unveiled in the form of two stories centred on new Mr Men character Little Miss Princess. The ever inspiring @oneforty posted a blog on 8 Ways to Use Social Media to Track Your Competition.

What have you been reading and sharing in the last seven days?